Many marketers view e-newsletters as a kind of interesting relic or an outmoded stepping stone between newspapers and social media. They may pull their writers away from the weekly or monthly newsletter and focus them instead on social media. After all, you can post that same information online and reach your audience instantly, right? However, when used correctly, e-newsletters can still be a valuable marketing tool, especially in the age of social media.

In an almost mythic way, the greatest strength of social media marketing is also its greatest weakness. Social media is instant communication, but it is also fleeting. Your carefully written post about the latest development in your industry may reach thousands of people in a second. But by the next second, it is drowned out by a dozen other posts.

An e-newsletter allows you to gather up all the interesting information about your business or industry and deliver it in a neat, simplistic package to your customers or clients. You can bring up all those interesting points that you pushed out to your social media audience and then expand on them a little — bring in a new perspective or add an extra thought.

At MediaSmack, we primarily handle legal marketing, which adds a whole extra challenge to newsletters. Still, an informative and well-written newsletter can create new opportunities and generate business for nearly any industry, and many of the same best practices apply.

The thing about newsletters is that first impressions matter a lot. If the first email a client or potential client reads is spammy or full of useless information, that person will more than likely unsubscribe or delete all subsequent emails. Therefore, you should take your time and make sure that you follow these tips for writing a solid newsletter.

Write for your audience.

For attorneys, newsletters can be a great way to reach potential clients, but they can also be a way to reach out to other law firms. An attorney-targeted newsletter can increase a firm’s chances of getting referral cases. However, you should never send the same newsletter to both clients and attorneys. If you are reaching out to regular people who may need a lawyer, then write in plain English, and choose topics that are relatable. Save the legal jargon and think pieces for the attorneys.

This same concept of audience segmentation applies to other industries. For example, a nonprofit organization may send one custom newsletter to donors (and potential donors) and another to customers or individuals who benefit from its services. Alternatively, a technology company might create a newsletter highlighting guides and learning opportunities for customers who are not tech savvy. The same company could then have an additional monthly newsletter that discusses industry news or more technical topics for customers, clients or industry peers who are more in the know. This segmentation allows you to specifically target separate groups that can build your business in different ways, instead of throwing out a wide net.

Many marketers view e-newsletters as a kind of interesting relic or an outmoded stepping stone between newspapers and social media. They may pull their writers away from the weekly or monthly newsletter and focus them instead on social media. After all, you can post that same information online and reach your audience instantly, right? However, when used correctly, e-newsletters can still be a valuable marketing tool, especially in the age of social media.

In an almost mythic way, the greatest strength of social media marketing is also its greatest weakness. Social media is instant communication, but it is also fleeting. Your carefully written post about the latest development in your industry may reach thousands of people in a second. But by the next second, it is drowned out by a dozen other posts.

An e-newsletter allows you to gather up all the interesting information about your business or industry and deliver it in a neat, simplistic package to your customers or clients. You can bring up all those interesting points that you pushed out to your social media audience and then expand on them a little — bring in a new perspective or add an extra thought.

At MediaSmack, we primarily handle legal marketing, which adds a whole extra challenge to newsletters. Still, an informative and well-written newsletter can create new opportunities and generate business for nearly any industry, and many of the same best practices apply.

The thing about newsletters is that first impressions matter a lot. If the first email a client or potential client reads is spammy or full of useless information, that person will more than likely unsubscribe or delete all subsequent emails. Therefore, you should take your time and make sure that you follow these tips for writing a solid newsletter.

Write for your audience.

For attorneys, newsletters can be a great way to reach potential clients, but they can also be a way to reach out to other law firms. An attorney-targeted newsletter can increase a firm’s chances of getting referral cases. However, you should never send the same newsletter to both clients and attorneys. If you are reaching out to regular people who may need a lawyer, then write in plain English, and choose topics that are relatable. Save the legal jargon and think pieces for the attorneys.

This same concept of audience segmentation applies to other industries. For example, a nonprofit organization may send one custom newsletter to donors (and potential donors) and another to customers or individuals who benefit from its services. Alternatively, a technology company might create a newsletter highlighting guides and learning opportunities for customers who are not tech savvy. The same company could then have an additional monthly newsletter that discusses industry news or more technical topics for customers, clients or industry peers who are more in the know. This segmentation allows you to specifically target separate groups that can build your business in different ways, instead of throwing out a wide net.Source link

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