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Credit: Republic

Caroline Hofmann, COO of Republic, tells me about their goal of creating a level playing field for all founders and investors.

In recent years, more and more individuals have become interested in investing in new companies. Many are familiar with perk-based crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter or charitable crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe. In the past, however, accredited investors were the only ones allowed to invest in startups through equity-based incentives.

Republic, a New York-based startup, is a first of its kind platform that enables everyone to invest in startups. Taking advantage of new laws, they are democratizing access to angel investing by allowing entrepreneurs to crowdfund investments. The team carefully vets early-stage startups and identifies high potential startups for their investor base. Users can easily sign up and browse available companies and start investing in minutes.

The team at Republic has recently stood out with the launch of their Crypto platform, where users can participate in token presales by investing as little as $10. In the past months, they hosted their first two token presales– both companies reached the regulatory cap of $1.07 million within hours. The team sees it as a way to give unaccredited investors the ability to participate in token sales, while ICOs in the US have only been open to accredited investors.

As a marketplace for investing their goal is twofold: give a level playing field for startups to invest, and provide all investors– regardless of wealth –the ability to invest in startups. In fact, through their platform, over 97% of the population can now invest in new companies, in addition&nbsp;to accredited investors, who make up 3% of the population.&nbsp;This has enabled a shift in the way people invest, and what they invest in– 35% of investments through their platform have gone to female founders, 43% to immigrant founders, and 25% to minority founders.

I sat down to speak with Caroline Hofmann, the COO of Republic, to chat about the idea behind the company and her journey in joining the team. Hofmann explains that helping solve the many challenges related to inequality, in education, healthcare and also financial had always been an area she was interested in working on. She grew up in Europe and came to the US to pursue an MBA at Harvard Business School. &nbsp;

“When you’re growing up, you hear a lot about the American Dream, so I was taken aback by the amount of inequality in income and opportunity here. I was fortunate to have access to a great education and exciting jobs in the US, but coming from a more equal society, this inequality always really bothered me.”

After working at McKinsey for seven years mostly in healthcare, she wanted to pursue something that could affect some change in who gets the opportunity to build a business. Building and growing Republic was a great way to give underserved founders an opportunity to raise capital.

“A lot of founders from top business schools will not have too much trouble finding seed funding. But there are so many more ideas out there, from a much more diverse set of founders. So I saw this as a compelling way to give people the opportunity to raise capital if they have great ideas. It’s a real meritocracy.”

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Credit: Republic

Caroline Hofmann, COO of Republic, tells me about their goal of creating a level playing field for all founders and investors.

In recent years, more and more individuals have become interested in investing in new companies. Many are familiar with perk-based crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter or charitable crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe. In the past, however, accredited investors were the only ones allowed to invest in startups through equity-based incentives.

Republic, a New York-based startup, is a first of its kind platform that enables everyone to invest in startups. Taking advantage of new laws, they are democratizing access to angel investing by allowing entrepreneurs to crowdfund investments. The team carefully vets early-stage startups and identifies high potential startups for their investor base. Users can easily sign up and browse available companies and start investing in minutes.

The team at Republic has recently stood out with the launch of their Crypto platform, where users can participate in token presales by investing as little as $10. In the past months, they hosted their first two token presales– both companies reached the regulatory cap of $1.07 million within hours. The team sees it as a way to give unaccredited investors the ability to participate in token sales, while ICOs in the US have only been open to accredited investors.

As a marketplace for investing their goal is twofold: give a level playing field for startups to invest, and provide all investors– regardless of wealth –the ability to invest in startups. In fact, through their platform, over 97% of the population can now invest in new companies, in addition to accredited investors, who make up 3% of the population. This has enabled a shift in the way people invest, and what they invest in– 35% of investments through their platform have gone to female founders, 43% to immigrant founders, and 25% to minority founders.

I sat down to speak with Caroline Hofmann, the COO of Republic, to chat about the idea behind the company and her journey in joining the team. Hofmann explains that helping solve the many challenges related to inequality, in education, healthcare and also financial had always been an area she was interested in working on. She grew up in Europe and came to the US to pursue an MBA at Harvard Business School.  

“When you’re growing up, you hear a lot about the American Dream, so I was taken aback by the amount of inequality in income and opportunity here. I was fortunate to have access to a great education and exciting jobs in the US, but coming from a more equal society, this inequality always really bothered me.”

After working at McKinsey for seven years mostly in healthcare, she wanted to pursue something that could affect some change in who gets the opportunity to build a business. Building and growing Republic was a great way to give underserved founders an opportunity to raise capital.

“A lot of founders from top business schools will not have too much trouble finding seed funding. But there are so many more ideas out there, from a much more diverse set of founders. So I saw this as a compelling way to give people the opportunity to raise capital if they have great ideas. It’s a real meritocracy.”

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