Credit: Nintendo

Contra 2 on the SNES Classic Edition.

The SNES Classic Edition is ready for occasional pre-order, inevitably kicking off another round of retro gaming mania, this time with some slightly more advanced games. But like the NES Classic Edition, the SNES isn’t quite just a recreation of the older console with pre-loaded games. For one thing, they have to adapt to modern TVs, and that means features to accommodate widescreen displays as well as the ability to toggle between a mode where each pixel is represented by a strict square and one that more closely tries to approximate the CRT screens people played these games on oh-so many years ago. And now we know about another neat feature of the SNES Classic Edition: a rewind function that should be able to take the edge off of some of the more challenging titles on offer.

The rewind feature is a refinement of the suspend points featured on the NES Classic. This time around, loading a suspend state will give you the option to rewind a little bit in order to take another run at a difficult portion by moving through some recorded gameplay and selecting exactly where you want to pick things up. From Nintendo’s official description:

"The upcoming Super Nintendo Entertainment System: Super NES Classic Edition system includes a Rewind feature that lets players rewind their gameplay to retry tricky sections, pick up missed items or simply run through an area again to see if anything was missed. The rewind time depends on the kind of game: Players can go back a few minutes in role-playing games such as Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, while action titles such as Super Mario World offer around 40 seconds, ideal for re-trying short segments of gameplay. The system also comes with optional frames that can be wrapped around the on-screen display for each game."

Kotaku and a few other outlets got to try the new feature hands on: the most interesting thing, to me, is that because the SNES Classic controllers are recreations of the old controllers, there’s no immediately accessible button to utilize rewind. You’ll instead need to push a button on the console itself, for which Kotaku recommends using some extra long HDMI cords so that you can keep the thing next to you at all times. It sort of negates the longer controller cords, which is a bit frustrating. But mechanical frustrations are part of the retro experience, I guess.

A greater challenge than any of the games actually shipping with the SNES Classic Edition, however, is likely to be getting your hands on one at all. Pre-orders have sold out every time they’ve gone live, and are likely to do so again. The NES Classic Edition proved nearly impossible to locate until Nintendo abruptly pulled the plug on production and left the console to either history or eBay, depending on how much you’re willing to shell out. Here’s hoping the company manages things a little better this time.

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Credit: Nintendo

Contra 2 on the SNES Classic Edition.

The SNES Classic Edition is ready for occasional pre-order, inevitably kicking off another round of retro gaming mania, this time with some slightly more advanced games. But like the NES Classic Edition, the SNES isn’t quite just a recreation of the older console with pre-loaded games. For one thing, they have to adapt to modern TVs, and that means features to accommodate widescreen displays as well as the ability to toggle between a mode where each pixel is represented by a strict square and one that more closely tries to approximate the CRT screens people played these games on oh-so many years ago. And now we know about another neat feature of the SNES Classic Edition: a rewind function that should be able to take the edge off of some of the more challenging titles on offer.

The rewind feature is a refinement of the suspend points featured on the NES Classic. This time around, loading a suspend state will give you the option to rewind a little bit in order to take another run at a difficult portion by moving through some recorded gameplay and selecting exactly where you want to pick things up. From Nintendo’s official description:

“The upcoming Super Nintendo Entertainment System: Super NES Classic Edition system includes a Rewind feature that lets players rewind their gameplay to retry tricky sections, pick up missed items or simply run through an area again to see if anything was missed. The rewind time depends on the kind of game: Players can go back a few minutes in role-playing games such as Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars, while action titles such as Super Mario World offer around 40 seconds, ideal for re-trying short segments of gameplay. The system also comes with optional frames that can be wrapped around the on-screen display for each game.”

Kotaku and a few other outlets got to try the new feature hands on: the most interesting thing, to me, is that because the SNES Classic controllers are recreations of the old controllers, there’s no immediately accessible button to utilize rewind. You’ll instead need to push a button on the console itself, for which Kotaku recommends using some extra long HDMI cords so that you can keep the thing next to you at all times. It sort of negates the longer controller cords, which is a bit frustrating. But mechanical frustrations are part of the retro experience, I guess.

A greater challenge than any of the games actually shipping with the SNES Classic Edition, however, is likely to be getting your hands on one at all. Pre-orders have sold out every time they’ve gone live, and are likely to do so again. The NES Classic Edition proved nearly impossible to locate until Nintendo abruptly pulled the plug on production and left the console to either history or eBay, depending on how much you’re willing to shell out. Here’s hoping the company manages things a little better this time.

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