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Through-the-roof expansion of Apple’s wearables section, Nokia reviewing how it feels about health monitoring gadgets and Apple Watch potentially spotting diabetes are all part of this week’s wearable tech news.

The Week in Wearables is a news digest, out each midweek, focused on some of the things that have happened in the world of tech you can wear on your wrist, perch on your head, stick in your ear, sling around your waist, tuck into the small of your back or, well, you get the idea.

PARIS, FRANCE – NOVEMBER 03: A signage for an Apple Watch Series 3 is displayed inside the Apple Store Saint-Germain, the day of the launch of the Apple iPhone X, the new model of Apple smartphone at the Apple Store Saint-Germain on November 3, 2017 in Paris, France. Apple’s latest iPhone X features face recognition technology, a large 5.8-inch edge-to-edge high resolution OLED display and better front and back cameras with optical image stabilisation. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Apple Reveals Huge Uptick in Watch Sales

The Steve Jobs Theater, that flexible, gorgeous underground space at the edge of the Apple Park campus, was host to the company’s annual shareholders meeting. Much was made of Apple Watch sales.

But the most interesting stuff came when Cook referred to the success of Apple Watch. The Watch sales are part of the wearables business which also includes headphones such as Beats and AirPods.

Last May, he said that business is approaching the size of a Fortune 500 company. More recently, last month, the size had crept up so it would fall in the top 400.

And this week he showed a video on the Watch and revealed that the business is approaching the size of a Fortune 300 company.

Read more at Forbes.

Jeff Williams, Apple’s chief operating officer, shows new Apple Watch products at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Apple Watch May Detect Diabetes

This comes a week after the news that Cardiogram working with UCSF have found that even the first Apple Watch may be rather good at predicting diabetes.

Researchers at digital health startup Cardiogram and UCSF (University of California San Francisco) have found that DeepHeart, a deep neural network, is managing to distinguish between people with diabetes and those without with a strikingly high accuracy rate – 85%.

And this is across a big data set of 200 million heart rate and step count measurements.

More in my post, here at Forbes.

The latest smartwatch from Nokia, the Steel HR.

Nokia Reviews Wearables

According to Michael Sawh at Wareable, Nokia has started a review of strategic options for its Digital Health business.

Translated, this could be bad news for its wearables and other connected health tech it currently offers.

This review will apparently include Nokia’s consumer and enterprise products, which covers its&nbsp;hybrid smartwatches, smart scales and digital health services. While the announcement by Nokia suggests the review ‘may or may not result in any transaction or other’, things are clearly not going as planned and there’s a possibility it could end up closing the doors on the division.&nbsp;

This comes soon after Nokia removed a feature from its top-of-the-range bathroom scales, so the Health section at Nokia is clearly being looked at carefully right now.

Read more at Wareable.

Movement Charges Gadgets

Staying with Wareable, Conor Allison remarks that electricity generated from movement could be harnessed to power electronic items.

A collaborative effort by groups at both the University of Buffalo and the Chinese Academy of Science has resulted in the development of a wearable metallic tab that’s able to pick up on body movements and generate electricity. Such a device would mean that wearers would be able to convert everyday energy expenditure into power for their smart devices.&nbsp;

“No one likes being tethered to a power outlet or lugging around a portable charger. The human body is an abundant source of energy. We thought: ‘Why not harness it to produce our own power?'” says lead author Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, in the&nbsp;published study.

Read more from Connor at Wareable here.

In this Sept. 15, 2017, photo, the cellular version of the Apple Watch Series 3, distinguished by the red dot on its crown, is displayed in New York. The new watch comes out Friday, Sept. 22. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

And finally…

The estimable Ben Sin has an excellent review of the Apple Watch 3 GPS + Cellular edition on Forbes right now – the LTE version of the Watch has just gone on sale in Hong Kong.

Perhaps the highest compliment I can give the Apple Watch Series 3 is that it made me use the iPhone X as my&nbsp;main phone again.

It’s not that I hate the iPhone X; I actually love its hardware and&nbsp;swiping&nbsp;gestures. But as I’ve written/tweeted/ranted on video/told friends hundreds of times before, I prefer Android to iOS (I like my homescreen customizable and all my notifications grouped properly on a single pane, just to give you two examples why). And since I have all the top phones, I can be picky, and for the most part, my main SIM card calls the Huawei Mate 10 Pro home.

But after testing Apple’s newest Apple Watch (the LTE edition just got released in Hong Kong this week) for a few days, I am enjoying the experience so much I swapped back to the iPhone X as my daily driver,&nbsp;mainly because Apple’s smartwatch (obviously) works better when paired with iOS than Android.

More from Ben at Forbes.

If you&nbsp;enjoyed&nbsp;this story, you might also like these:

Apple CEO Reveals Watch Business Approaching Fortune 300-Size Company

How To Buy Apple Watch Series 3 For $50 Less – Refurbished, Direct From Apple

Ten Things Nobody Has Told You About The Apple HomePod (Updated: This Post Now Goes To 11!)

Apple Watch, Even The First One, May Be Able To Detect Signs Of Diabetes

Apple HomePod Definitive Review: Hey, Siri, You Sound Spectacular, But Is That Enough?

Apple HomePod Reviews Roundup: Irreproachably Good Audio, Mixed Verdicts On Smarts (Updated)

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Through-the-roof expansion of Apple’s wearables section, Nokia reviewing how it feels about health monitoring gadgets and Apple Watch potentially spotting diabetes are all part of this week’s wearable tech news.

The Week in Wearables is a news digest, out each midweek, focused on some of the things that have happened in the world of tech you can wear on your wrist, perch on your head, stick in your ear, sling around your waist, tuck into the small of your back or, well, you get the idea.

PARIS, FRANCE – NOVEMBER 03: A signage for an Apple Watch Series 3 is displayed inside the Apple Store Saint-Germain, the day of the launch of the Apple iPhone X, the new model of Apple smartphone at the Apple Store Saint-Germain on November 3, 2017 in Paris, France. Apple’s latest iPhone X features face recognition technology, a large 5.8-inch edge-to-edge high resolution OLED display and better front and back cameras with optical image stabilisation. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Apple Reveals Huge Uptick in Watch Sales

The Steve Jobs Theater, that flexible, gorgeous underground space at the edge of the Apple Park campus, was host to the company’s annual shareholders meeting. Much was made of Apple Watch sales.

But the most interesting stuff came when Cook referred to the success of Apple Watch. The Watch sales are part of the wearables business which also includes headphones such as Beats and AirPods.

Last May, he said that business is approaching the size of a Fortune 500 company. More recently, last month, the size had crept up so it would fall in the top 400.

And this week he showed a video on the Watch and revealed that the business is approaching the size of a Fortune 300 company.

Read more at Forbes.

Jeff Williams, Apple’s chief operating officer, shows new Apple Watch products at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Cupertino, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Apple Watch May Detect Diabetes

This comes a week after the news that Cardiogram working with UCSF have found that even the first Apple Watch may be rather good at predicting diabetes.

Researchers at digital health startup Cardiogram and UCSF (University of California San Francisco) have found that DeepHeart, a deep neural network, is managing to distinguish between people with diabetes and those without with a strikingly high accuracy rate – 85%.

And this is across a big data set of 200 million heart rate and step count measurements.

More in my post, here at Forbes.

The latest smartwatch from Nokia, the Steel HR.

Nokia Reviews Wearables

According to Michael Sawh at Wareable, Nokia has started a review of strategic options for its Digital Health business.

Translated, this could be bad news for its wearables and other connected health tech it currently offers.

This review will apparently include Nokia’s consumer and enterprise products, which covers its hybrid smartwatches, smart scales and digital health services. While the announcement by Nokia suggests the review ‘may or may not result in any transaction or other’, things are clearly not going as planned and there’s a possibility it could end up closing the doors on the division. 

This comes soon after Nokia removed a feature from its top-of-the-range bathroom scales, so the Health section at Nokia is clearly being looked at carefully right now.

Read more at Wareable.

Movement Charges Gadgets

Staying with Wareable, Conor Allison remarks that electricity generated from movement could be harnessed to power electronic items.

A collaborative effort by groups at both the University of Buffalo and the Chinese Academy of Science has resulted in the development of a wearable metallic tab that’s able to pick up on body movements and generate electricity. Such a device would mean that wearers would be able to convert everyday energy expenditure into power for their smart devices. 

“No one likes being tethered to a power outlet or lugging around a portable charger. The human body is an abundant source of energy. We thought: ‘Why not harness it to produce our own power?'” says lead author Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, in the published study.

Read more from Connor at Wareable here.

In this Sept. 15, 2017, photo, the cellular version of the Apple Watch Series 3, distinguished by the red dot on its crown, is displayed in New York. The new watch comes out Friday, Sept. 22. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

And finally…

The estimable Ben Sin has an excellent review of the Apple Watch 3 GPS + Cellular edition on Forbes right now – the LTE version of the Watch has just gone on sale in Hong Kong.

Perhaps the highest compliment I can give the Apple Watch Series 3 is that it made me use the iPhone X as my main phone again.

It’s not that I hate the iPhone X; I actually love its hardware and swiping gestures. But as I’ve written/tweeted/ranted on video/told friends hundreds of times before, I prefer Android to iOS (I like my homescreen customizable and all my notifications grouped properly on a single pane, just to give you two examples why). And since I have all the top phones, I can be picky, and for the most part, my main SIM card calls the Huawei Mate 10 Pro home.

But after testing Apple’s newest Apple Watch (the LTE edition just got released in Hong Kong this week) for a few days, I am enjoying the experience so much I swapped back to the iPhone X as my daily driver, mainly because Apple’s smartwatch (obviously) works better when paired with iOS than Android.

More from Ben at Forbes.

If you enjoyed this story, you might also like these:

Apple CEO Reveals Watch Business Approaching Fortune 300-Size Company

How To Buy Apple Watch Series 3 For $50 Less – Refurbished, Direct From Apple

Ten Things Nobody Has Told You About The Apple HomePod (Updated: This Post Now Goes To 11!)

Apple Watch, Even The First One, May Be Able To Detect Signs Of Diabetes

Apple HomePod Definitive Review: Hey, Siri, You Sound Spectacular, But Is That Enough?

Apple HomePod Reviews Roundup: Irreproachably Good Audio, Mixed Verdicts On Smarts (Updated)

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